Sunday, 1 April 2012

A host of golden daffodils

We travelled slightly north to Grasmere to visit Dove Cottage - once home to William Wordsworth and his posse of family and friends.

I studied Wordsworth at school, and wasn't a big fan of his work back then, but can see the genius of it these days. However, I think the lifestyle of the poet and pals make much more interesting reading.
He lived with his sister Dorothy who was a blogger - well she probably would have been had she lived in these times. She was a diarist and her works provide a fascinating insight into how they lived in the late 1700's and how the Wordsworth family in particular lived. She wrote about everything - tooth ache, what they were eating at meal times, what she shopped for and where she walked. She also wrote about the visitors they had at the cottage. I think Dorothy's works are far more interesting than Williams actually.
When he married, his wife also brought her unmarried sister to live with them and then she went on to have 3 children. It is a very tiny cottage for 4 adults, 3 children and varies visitors to have lived in.
The cottage (with the smoking chimney) would have had uninterrupted views of the lake in Wordsworth's day. The houses behind would not have been built then. The garden at the cottage was inspirational too, with quotes from Dorothy's diaries written on slate.

We enjoyed a walk around the village.


Such a beautiful little spot surrounded by the hills.
We found yet another stream for a spot of feet cooling!



I can heartily recommend a visit to Grasmere. As Wordsworth said "The loveliest spot that man hath ever found". And I'll leave you with the words of the man himself:

I WANDER'D lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host of golden daffodils,
Beside the lake, beneath the trees, 5
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.
Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the Milky Way,
They stretch'd in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay: 10
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
The waves beside them danced, but they
Outdid the sparkling waves in glee:—
A poet could not but be gay 15
In such a jocund company!
I gazed, and gazed, but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought:
For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood, 20
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

15 comments:

Food, Fun and Life in the Charente said...

Beautiful photos and I love the verse. looks a good place to visit especially in spring. Have a great Day. t'other Diane

greenthumb said...

Such beautiful place to vist, lucky you.

Betty said...

We had 'houses' at school and mine was Wordsworth so naturally I learned his poetry and it is beautiful, but seeing the setting that inspired him is interesting. I would love to stay there, Dorothy does indeed seem like a blogger in the wrong era and an interesting lady.

diane b said...

It certainly is a place that would inspire writers and artists. Lovely shots of around the village. Love the doors and windows.

Lyn said...

We have never been here and it's now on my to-do list. I love the quotes in the garden and I think your right, Dorothy would of been a blogger!
xxx

Jo said...

What a wonderful place to visit, that's now going on my list. It looks so beautiful around the area.

BadPenny said...

Another beautiful place to visit. Dorothy sounds fun & would have a lively blog if around today !

Toffeeapple said...

That was the first poem I ever learned by heart.

Jan said...

It looks as if you had fabulous weather. Grasmere is one of my favourite places. The walking round there is amazing! JX

Lisa said...

I wonder what Dorothy would have called her blog?!
Fab photos of another beautiful destination.
Lisa x

Louise said...

Lovely scenery. Did you have any Grasmere gingerbread?

Lady Mondegreen's Secret Garden said...

More artistry inspired of the landscape - loved that little coda of Dorothy's about planting in the moonlight. It's what turns observation into poetry. Thanks for the host of golden daffodils :-)

Rosie said...

I'm sure Dorothy would have written a blog, too and I find her writing fascinating! I'm really enjoying visiting these places with you:)

noelle said...

I'm glad you had such a lovely time. Looking forward to seeing you later in the year!! Thanks for the comment over at mine!! xx

A garden just outside Venice said...

I learnt that beautiful poem at school! :)
xxxxx