Monday, 31 August 2009

Eyam

Well the early start that I had envisaged didn't materialise, but eventually we got our act together and headed out into the Peak District. We parked in Stoney Middleton, which I have to say does not look very appealing from the roadside, but once you head into the village itself, the houses and settings are truly beautiful. They seem to have an obsession with things heartshaped in the village!!



We walked from Stoney Middleton down to the village of Froggat which is on the river derwent. It was then a very steep climb back up to the pretty village of Eyam.

A bit out of sequence - and I couldn't get it to budge!!! but the line of rock at the top of this picture is Froggat Edge. The leaves on the trees are definately on the turn. The village of Eyam is sadly famous for being the only place outside of London to suffer from the plague in 1665. It is thought that the plague was carried in some damp cloth that was sent from London to a young man who was the Tailor in Eyam and the first to die. A lot of the houses have plaques telling the sad tale of the occupants who died. I did notice that a lot of the families lost all the family members apart from the mothers - this proves that even in the 1600's, mothers were still not allowed to be ill!!!


The villagers decided that to stop the disease from spreading, they would quarantine themselves and not many of them actually left. This is called the boundry stone and neighbouring villagers would bring food and medicinal supplies to leave here. The people of Eyam used to fill the holes with vinegar and leave the money in the vinegar to kill the germs!! It must have worked because to my knowledge it did not spread outside of the village.

After a quick pint at the pub (the hill had been very steep so we deserved it) we headed back to Sheffield. Can you see what a gorgeous purple colour the heather is on the moors at the moment.
We stopped off at Padley Gorge - the cool water was heaven on our feet after a day in walking boots.

Back to work tomorrow.

18 comments:

Lydia said...

Hi Diane -

You've been on my old home turf & its lovely to see it! I spent a lot of time in Eyam in my youth. Its a lovely village, as is Stoney Middleton, once you are off the main road - I once baby sat in the house next to the Churchyard there - it was really old & I was really scared!

Been catching up with your old posts & loved the one on Sutton Scarsdale. Its demise is sad to read about - It was famous for its Italian plaster fresco's, which were stripped and sold off. I believe there is a piece in the White House though...

Hope you have had a fab 6 weeks with your children ?When do you find time to knit?

Love Lydia xx

Lisa said...

What a sad piece of history that lovely village has.
The red heart metalwork is really unusual.
Lisa x

The Girl said...

I've always wanted to go to Eyam - I remember learning about the plague at school when I was about 9 or 10 and was absolutely fascinated. It's lovely that the plaques have been put up so the memory of what they did is not forgotten.

Gilly said...

Love it up there! Must get out if the heather is as good as that!

Tabiboo said...

All those adorable hearts!!

Nina x

The sewing room said...

What a great place with all that history to see ,and great heart,s you have given me yet another place l would like to visit thank you.


Have a great week hugs Pat

Michela said...

You're a great tour guide, always careful to details (especially to the heartshaped ones!)

Rosie said...

A lot of my husband's ancestors came from Eyam and Stoney Middleton and when we visited Stoney Middleton to look at the church and etc I thought at first what a strange place - it felt slightly claustrophobic but then as we ventured into the heart of all the houses I loved it, with its buildings on different levels and uneven rooflines - I now find it intriguing. Eyam is a wonderful place but so sad too! Have you read the novel 'A Year of Wonders' by Geraldine Brooks? It is about the plague reaching Eyam and is a fascinating read:)

LOVE STITCHING RED said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Blueberry Heart said...

ooooh, I want to live there!!!! not for the gory (although interesting!) past but a wine bar with a heart shaped sign???? WANT ONE!!!!

BH x

Jenny said...

That heart balcony is so beautiful and I love the contrast of modern red ironwork and old mellow stone, brilliant.

sarah-jane down the lane said...

When are you and the clan moving to the Hearshaped Homeland?

Lovely tour Diane, thank you.

Hope the first day back wasn't too much of a downer :D Thinking of you,
Sarah x

JuliaB said...

Lovely tour diane. And stunning heather! x

Felicity said...

it looks so pretty, i love the bunting and heart railing! fliss xx

Karens Hopes said...

Lovely photographs, you look like you had a good time.
Karen

bad penny said...

My son went there on a residential school trip and then produced an amasing piece of work on it. Love hearts - Birthday on Valentine's day !

Rowan said...

Eyam is a fascinating place isn't it? I've driven through Stoney Middleton dozens of times but have never stopped there largely because I got the same impression that you did:) Obviously I must make the effort to explore it properly. That photo of the moors is wonderful, I love it at this time of year when the heather is out.

lesley said...

I enjoyed reading the history on this. We have a similar village near us, which was also affected by the plague. they split the village in two, if you hadn't caught the plague you could live in White Notley, if you were unlucky...you got tranferred to Black Notley...just up the road from the Notley's is Rotten End...goodness knows what went on there?!!